'Where There's Smoke' by Faculty Member, Lance Weiler, Premiered At Tribeca Film Festival 2019

May 8, 2019

Where There’s Smoke, an immersive storytelling experience created by Faculty member Lance Weiler, received its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this month.

 

Still from Where There is Smoke

Still from Where There’s Smoke, image courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival

 

Where There’s Smoke is a neo-noir story of arson set against the backdrop of a small town, inspired by true events. Weiler's father was a volunteer firefighter and amateur fire scene photographer, and the project explores two mysterious blazes that forever altered a tight-knit community. A selection of Tribeca’s Virtual Arcade program, in Where There’s Smoke, participants literally walk through one man’s memories and engage with his grief.

 

Indiewire called Where There’s Smoke “Weiler’s Most Poignant Work Yet,” describing it as “a unique immersive experience with deep personal resonance”.

 

Lance Weiler is a storyteller, entrepreneur and thought leader. An alumnus of the Sundance Screenwriters Lab, he is recognized as a pioneer because of the way he mixes storytelling and technology. Weiler spent over 10,000 hours on film sets working his way through the ranks. He trained as a Camera Assistant and then worked extensively as a writer, director and producer, developing TV and film properties for FOX, TNT, Starz and Endomel. Weiler has advised and consulted programs and initiatives for IBM, Twitter, Microsoft, Samsung, Chernin Entertainment, Ubisoft, Penguin Books, the U.S. State Department, CAA, Ogilvy, McCann-Erickson and others. He has also served as an advisor and mentor to educational programs and labs for organizations such as the Sundance Institute, Tribeca Film Institute, PBS, Power to the Pixel, Screen Australia, Berlin Film Festival, the National Film Board of Canada and the National Endowment for the Humanities. At Columbia, Weiler is the director and founding member of the Digital Storytelling Lab which is focussed on exploring new forms and functions of storytelling.